Addressing Wedding Invitations

Addressing Wedding Invitations

4 of 11 Guests' Names Though etiquette for addressing and assembling wedding invitations has relaxed, there are still some requirements. For example, your guests’ names should be written in full on outer envelopes; avoid nicknames or initials. Use the appropriate social titles as well, such as addressing married couples as “Mr. and Mrs.” If a man’s name has a suffix, write “Mr. Joseph Morales, Jr.,” or “Mr. Joseph Morales IV”; “Junior” can be spelled out on a more formal invitation. “The little things do matter,” says Dorothea Johnson, etiquette expert and founder and director of the Protocol School of Washington, in Yarmouth, Maine. “When a couple uses the appropriate honorific and writes out an address in the correct way, it shows they’ve put thought into it.” And when your guests receive your invitation, expertly assembled and addressed, there will be no doubt that you have done just that. Photography: Bryan Gardner Learn More About Addressing Guests
addressing wedding invitations 1

Addressing Wedding Invitations

Though etiquette for addressing and assembling wedding invitations has relaxed, there are still some requirements. For example, your guests’ names should be written in full on outer envelopes; avoid nicknames or initials. Use the appropriate social titles as well, such as addressing married couples as “Mr. and Mrs.” If a man’s name has a suffix, write “Mr. Joseph Morales, Jr.,” or “Mr. Joseph Morales IV”; “Junior” can be spelled out on a more formal invitation. “The little things do matter,” says Dorothea Johnson, etiquette expert and founder and director of the Protocol School of Washington, in Yarmouth, Maine. “When a couple uses the appropriate honorific and writes out an address in the correct way, it shows they’ve put thought into it.” And when your guests receive your invitation, expertly assembled and addressed, there will be no doubt that you have done just that. Photography: Bryan Gardner Learn More About Addressing Guests
addressing wedding invitations 2

Addressing Wedding Invitations

You may also be interested in: Ceremony Seating Arrangements Who sits where at the wedding ceremony? How do you handle seating for complicated family situations? And, is it okay not to have “sides” at all? View more wedding advice How to Handle Missing or Extra RSVPs Several of our friends have not responded to our wedding invitations. Plus, some who have responded have returned their RSVPs with additional names written in-even though their invitations did not include “and guest.” What should we do? View more wedding advice Little Extras for Guest Comfort Seeing to guests’ comfort goes beyond keeping their drinks full. Think about any needs your guests might not have anticipated, or little extras they might be grateful for. View more wedding advice
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Addressing Wedding Invitations

Though etiquette for addressing and assembling wedding invitations has relaxed, there are still some requirements. For example, your guests’ names should be written in full on outer envelopes; avoid nicknames or initials. Use the appropriate social titles as well, such as addressing married couples as “Mr. and Mrs.” If a man’s name has a suffix, write “Mr. Joseph Morales, Jr.,” or “Mr. Joseph Morales IV”; “Junior” can be spelled out on a more formal invitation.
addressing wedding invitations 4

Addressing Wedding Invitations

Though etiquette for addressing and assembling wedding invitations has relaxed, there are still some requirements. For example, your guests’ names should be written in full on outer envelopes; avoid nicknames or initials. Use the appropriate social titles as well, such as addressing married couples as “Mr. and Mrs.” If a man’s name has a suffix, write “Mr. Joseph Morales, Jr.,” or “Mr. Joseph Morales IV”; “Junior” can be spelled out on a more formal invitation. “The little things do matter,” says Dorothea Johnson, etiquette expert and founder and director of the Protocol School of Washington, in Yarmouth, Maine. “When a couple uses the appropriate honorific and writes out an address in the correct way, it shows they’ve put thought into it.” And when your guests receive your invitation, expertly assembled and addressed, there will be no doubt that you have done just that. Photography: Bryan Gardner
addressing wedding invitations 5

Addressing Wedding Invitations

Though etiquette for addressing and assembling wedding invitations has relaxed, there are still some requirements. For example, your guests’ names should be written in full on outer envelopes; avoid nicknames or initials. Use the appropriate social titles as well, such as addressing married couples as “Mr. and Mrs.” If a man’s name has a suffix, write “Mr. Joseph Morales, Jr.,” or “Mr. Joseph Morales IV”; “Junior” can be spelled out on a more formal invitation. “The little things do matter,” says Dorothea Johnson, etiquette expert and founder and director of the Protocol School of Washington, in Yarmouth, Maine. “When a couple uses the appropriate honorific and writes out an address in the correct way, it shows they’ve put thought into it.” And when your guests receive your invitation, expertly assembled and addressed, there will be no doubt that you have done just that.
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But the truth is, the etiquette of addressing wedding invitations can feel a little byzantine and hard to mesh with our current feminist and genderqueer reality. So with some help from the #APWplanner, I’ve put together a handy Internet-friendly guide that you can use for even the most formal of wedding invites. (In fact, please use it for the most formal of wedding invites.)
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The towns listed here will cancel your stamps for you, imprinting them with their sweet names. Call ahead to let the postmaster know the invitations are on their way. Then enclose your stamped, addressed invitations in a large padded envelope or box, along with a note detailing your request and send it to the postmaster in your chosen town. Consider sending the envelopes Priority or Express Mail, so you can track the package. Do ask the postmaster how long it will take so that you can allow enough time for invitations to be delivered, postmarked, and mailed out.
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11 of 11 Special Postmark The towns listed here will cancel your stamps for you, imprinting them with their sweet names. Call ahead to let the postmaster know the invitations are on their way. Then enclose your stamped, addressed invitations in a large padded envelope or box, along with a note detailing your request and send it to the postmaster in your chosen town. Consider sending the envelopes Priority or Express Mail, so you can track the package. Do ask the postmaster how long it will take so that you can allow enough time for invitations to be delivered, postmarked, and mailed out. Bliss, New York 14024; 585-322-7740Bridal Veil, Oregon 97010; 503-695-2380Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514; 919-942-4170Darling, Mississippi 38623; 662-326-8408Deary, Idaho 83823; 208-877-1470Groom, Texas 79039; 806-248-7988Harmony, Rhode Island 02829; 401-949-2745Honeyville, Utah 84314; 435-279-8213Kissimmee, Florida 34744; 407-846-0999Lovely, Kentucky 41231; 606-395-5848Loving, Texas 76460; 940-378-2259Luck, Wisconsin 54853; 715-472-2079Romance, Arkansas 72136; 501-556-5911
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The towns listed here will cancel your stamps for you, imprinting them with their sweet names. Call ahead to let the postmaster know the invitations are on their way. Then enclose your stamped, addressed invitations in a large padded envelope or box, along with a note detailing your request and send it to the postmaster in your chosen town. Consider sending the envelopes Priority or Express Mail, so you can track the package. Do ask the postmaster how long it will take so that you can allow enough time for invitations to be delivered, postmarked, and mailed out. Bliss, New York 14024; 585-322-7740Bridal Veil, Oregon 97010; 503-695-2380Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514; 919-942-4170Darling, Mississippi 38623; 662-326-8408Deary, Idaho 83823; 208-877-1470Groom, Texas 79039; 806-248-7988Harmony, Rhode Island 02829; 401-949-2745Honeyville, Utah 84314; 435-279-8213Kissimmee, Florida 34744; 407-846-0999Lovely, Kentucky 41231; 606-395-5848Loving, Texas 76460; 940-378-2259Luck, Wisconsin 54853; 715-472-2079Romance, Arkansas 72136; 501-556-5911
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I believe people should be honored for their level of education. Not in a “only save the college graduates in a nuclear holocaust” sort of way, but when you’re addressing wedding invitations…why not? While privilege may have afforded some people with higher degrees the opportunity to get it done, one doesn’t necessarily follow the other. And it’s not like you can just check a box on a form, pay your $xxx,xxx and get a degree — it’s a LOT of work. And I believe those who have taken the time to do the work should get some small perks. But you do you. And speaking of privilege…what did men ever do to get Mr. listed first on an envelope? At least with this Dr. rule, you’re rewarding someone for hard work which may or may not go alongside privilege.
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So, I’m a cis woman with a usually male first name. I often get misgendered in non-face-to-face interactions (even on the phone! my voice is not particularly masculine!), and it’s generally easy for me to take it in stride. I was, however, a little startled to receive a wedding invitation addressed to Mr. Kyle Mylastname from very good friends of mine. What happened was they just put the names on a spreadsheet and a friend of *theirs* formatted the envelopes and decided whether to use honorifics. I met said friend at the wedding and she was embarrassed and said that she should know better by now because she actually did the same thing on her *own* wedding invitations for one of her husband’s aunts. And then, when the happy couple got to their honeymoon destination, they were more than a little annoyed to find their honeymoon package addressed to “Mr. and Mrs. Firstname Lastname” – they are both Misters and don’t have the same last name. Anyway: hopefully you know the people you’re inviting to your wedding well enough to know (or at least make a good guess) as to how they would like to be addressed. And don’t outsource honorific assignments! And vendors, WTF, how can you still get away with making assumptions like that about how people want to be addressed? I would be even more pissed to addressed as Mrs. Husbandsname than I was being addressed as Mr. Myname.